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FIRAZYR is a medicine used to treat acute attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE) in adults 18 years of age and older.

Attack the Attacks

Nov 19

Learning How to Do My Own Injections

Published on November 19, 2014 in Attack the Attacks 0

My motto when it comes to overcoming my fears is this: Just breathe, and take the leap! But in some cases, like when my doctor and I discuss using FIRAZYR® (icatibant injection) to treat my acute HAE attacks, I make sure it’s an educated, well-trained leap! FIRAZYR is a medicine used to treat acute attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE) in adults 18 years of age and older.

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Oct 29

When I was diagnosed with hereditary angioedema (HAE) more than 20 years ago, my loved ones worried that people would treat me differently if they knew I had a “disease.” They said I should call my HAE a “condition.” Instead, I just never really said too much at all about my HAE. But since then I’ve learned that it’s OK for me to be open about HAE.

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Oct 22

Living with hereditary angioedema can mean that trips to the hospital are sometimes unavoidable and unpredictable. Even when you have a treatment for acute HAE attacks, it’s important to remember that you still have to go to the hospital for throat attacks. When I do have to go to the ER, those trips can sometimes last for hours, and counting the ceiling tiles is only fun for a little while. So, over the years, I’ve learned how to make the most out of my time while at the hospital.

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Oct 08

Once I decided to be serious about taking care of my hereditary angioedema, I started by being honest. Not just with myself and my wife, but with my healthcare team as well. It wasn’t easy at first for a sometimes stubborn guy like me, but it has definitely made a difference in the care I’ve received from my healthcare providers.

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What is FIRAZYR?

FIRAZYR is prescribed to treat acute HAE attacks in adults 18 years of age and older.

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