FIRAZYR Frequently Asked Questions

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FIRAZYR is used to treat acute attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE) in adults 18 years of age and older. It's an injection you can give yourself just under the skin as soon as you recognize symptoms, after you have been trained by a healthcare professional.

What did you think about taking FIRAZYR at first?

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How did you make the decision to use FIRAZYR for acute HAE attacks?

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Were you scared when you administered your first injection?

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Is FIRAZYR (icatibant injection) portable?

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FIRAZYR is the only HAE treatment that directly blocks bradykinin from binding the B2 receptors. Bradykinin is thought to be the cause of the characteristic HAE symptoms of swelling, inflammation, and pain. FIRAZYR efficacy and safety were assessed in clinical studies, where a range of patient responses were seen. Across the pivotal studies, half of the patients had their pretreatment symptoms reduced by 50% in 2.0 to 2.3 hours.* In Trial 1, half of the patients experienced almost complete symptom relief in 8 hours.* Learn More »

*Across the clinical trials, patients treated with FIRAZYR (icatibant injection) had a median time to 50% reduction from baseline symptoms ranging from 2.0 to 2.3 hours, and in Trial 1, a median time to almost complete reduction of baseline symptoms in 8 hours. Patient responses may vary.

FIRAZYR is for adults 18 years or older with HAE. Before using FIRAZYR, tell your healthcare provider if you are pregnant or nursing or if you have any other medical conditions, because these conditions could affect your treatment. Learn more »

Tell your healthcare provider about all the medicines you take, including prescription and nonprescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

You should let your healthcare provider know if you are taking an ACE inhibitor, such as lisinopril or captopril. These types of medications could interact with FIRAZYR. Learn more »

The injection site should be a skin fold on your abdomen or stomach approximately 2–4 inches (5–10 cm) below your belly button on either side. This area should be at least 2 inches (5 cm) away from any scars. Do not choose an area that is bruised, swollen or painful. Learn more »

Yes. You can treat acute HAE attacks that occur in different parts of the body, including the abdomen, throat or skin. But always remember: If you have an attack in your throat (a laryngeal attack), inject FIRAZYR and then go immediately to the nearest hospital emergency room. Learn more »

Most people with HAE either do not have enough of a protein called C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), or the protein they do have doesn't work as it should.

Because of this, at times, the body makes too much of another protein called bradykinin. Having too much bradykinin allows water and other fluids to leak out of the blood vessels and into areas of the body where they shouldn’t. Bradykinin is thought to be responsible for the characteristic HAE symptoms of swelling, inflammation and pain.

FIRAZYR blocks bradykinin from binding the B2 receptor to treat the symptoms of an acute attack. Learn more »

FIRAZYR should be taken when you recognize the symptoms of an HAE attack. FIRAZYR should be administered as a slow injection, over at least 30 seconds, under the skin in the abdominal area. Learn more »

Yes. After you receive training from a healthcare professional, you or your caregiver can administer FIRAZYR. But always remember: If you have an attack in your throat (laryngeal attack), inject FIRAZYR as directed and then go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away. Learn more »

FIRAZYR should be taken when you recognize the symptoms of an HAE attack. If your symptoms continue or come back, you may repeat your FIRAZYR injection at least 6 hours apart. Do not use more than 3 doses of FIRAZYR in a 24-hour period. Learn more »

Across controlled trials (FAST-1, 2 &3), an analysis showed that the median time to 50% symptom reduction with FIRAZYR was consistent for up to 5 separate non-throat attacks. Learn more »

Injection-site reactions typically involve redness, bruising, swelling, warmth, burning, itching, irritation, hives, numbness, pressure or pain at the injection site. In clinical trials, 97% of patients experienced injection-site reactions.

For more information, please see the Important Safety Information and full Prescribing Information. Learn more »

In clinical trials, the chance of getting an injection-site reaction was about the same whether patients gave the injection themselves or had it done by a healthcare professional. Learn more »

The most common side effects of FIRAZYR include:

  • redness, bruising, swelling, warmth, burning, itching, irritation, hives, numbness, pressure or pain at the injection site
  • fever
  • too much of an enzyme called transaminase in your blood
  • dizziness
  • nausea
  • headache
  • rash

These are not all of the possible side effects of FIRAZYR. For more information, see the full Prescribing Information for FIRAZYR or talk to your healthcare provider.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088. Learn more »

In clinical trials, no hypersensitivity or anaphylactic reactions were reported.
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